Wednesday, May 22, 2019

One year ago, I made the foolish mistake of not reading every document carefully before signing each one



                                                                                                          
                                                                                                            May 23, 2018

Gerald Naperville, Inc.
1661 Aurora Ave.
Naperville, IL 60540

Dear Anthony Triner, Sales Manager:

I purchased a 2015 Subaru Forester on May 22nd. During conversations with one of your salesman, my wife and I were told the car had your so-called $2000 Gerald Protection Plan. We assumed, however, that this protection was already included in the overall price of the vehicle because the salesman never said we had to pay additionally for such a plan. ­Note: I never saw the current selling-price invoice of the vehicle, nor was I given one for my records.

Moreover, to verify our assumption, Gino Tairi, one of your sales managers, wrote down his quoted price for the car on the back of his card: “$18,995. + Title, Taxes and License for $20,736.” He did not include the cost of the Protection Plan. Though Mr. Tairi also offered $2800 for my truck, it didn’t occur to me until the next morning that we paid too much for the car: a total of $19,863. Without the so-called Protection Plan, I should have paid $17,879. In a whirlwind of “sign here; sign here” over several exhausting hours, I made the foolish mistake of not reading every document carefully before signing each one.

Furthermore, regarding the Gerald Protection Plan, here are five reasons why I believe your dealership did not perform the work required by your so-called plan (“Clear Door Guards, Wheel Locks, Theft Protection, Nitrogen Tire Fill, Paint & Fabric Protection”) as well.

1) I brought my car in the following morning for replacement of two plastic adhesive Door Guards that were pealing off.
2) There are no Wheel Locks for the tires.
3) The original invoice of the car reveals it already had a Theft Protection System installed in 2015.
4) It is doubtful that air in the tires of the car were deflated just to put in Nitrogen. It is more likely Nitrogen was already inflated in the tires in 2015.
5) It is evident that a dealership that does not do simple tasks, such as placing wheel locks on the tires and checking and replacing damaged door guards, would undoubtedly not provide Paint, Fabric and Vinyl Protection for the car either.

Finally, when I buy new or used cars, I receive two sets of keys for the automobile. The salesman told me: “We really don’t have control over trades that we take in and if the customer provides us with a second key.” I was then told by the service department that I would be charged $400+ for a second key.

Unfortunately, what I have experienced doing business with Gerald Kia/Subaru of Naperville is that this multi-million dollar company seems unethical and dishonest, and that I also made a serious mistake buying a car from Gerald Kia/Subaru of Naperville.


Glen Brown 


P.S.

On May 24, I received a full refund check for the Gerald Protection Plan after meeting with the General Sales Manager. I also received a second key, free of charge. 



4 comments:

  1. From John C.

    "I often feel that I have somehow overpaid when trading cars. Just too much confusion when making that deal and no one can really grasp everything."

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi Glen,

    I hope all is well. Your post is a sad note not only of the admonition, Buyer beware!, but a sad note on the motivation for buyers being aware, that some in sales will do anything that they can get away with in order to make a sale. Further, the adverse sales behavior is acceptable by the company at large as long as it's not detected; duplicity thy name is profit!

    Best,

    Tony H.

    ReplyDelete
  3. From Kirill T.

    "At least, it paid to communicate the problems and your doubts to the dealership. Now you can see why they used to say that Nixon looked like and had the ethics of a used car salesman."

    ReplyDelete
  4. Glen good on you for being persistent. One strategy that I have used in our digital age when wanting to talk about good Customer Service or the lack thereof is the use of Twitter. I search for their account and/or the parent company and post my issue/concern for the them and the world to read. This typically gets a very quick response and a willingness to work through the issue. If not I keep posting showing that this company is not responsive to Customer Care. All most always a favorable resolution occurs. Good Luck!

    ReplyDelete