Friday, December 18, 2015

Two Poems by Langston Hughes





Kids Who Die

This is for the kids who die,
Black and white,
For kids will die certainly.
The old and rich will live on awhile,
As always,
Eating blood and gold,
Letting kids die.

Kids will die in the swamps of Mississippi
Organizing sharecroppers
Kids will die in the streets of Chicago
Organizing workers
Kids will die in the orange groves of California
Telling others to get together
Whites and Filipinos,
Negroes and Mexicans,
All kinds of kids will die
Who don’t believe in lies, and bribes, and contentment
And a lousy peace.

Of course, the wise and the learned
Who pen editorials in the papers,
And the gentlemen with Dr. in front of their names
White and black,
Who make surveys and write books
Will live on weaving words to smother the kids who die,
And the sleazy courts,
And the bribe-reaching police,
And the blood-loving generals,
And the money-loving preachers
Will all raise their hands against the kids who die,
Beating them with laws and clubs and bayonets and bullets
To frighten the people—
For the kids who die are like iron in the blood of the people—
And the old and rich don’t want the people
To taste the iron of the kids who die,
Don’t want the people to get wise to their own power,
To believe an Angelo Herndon, or even get together

Listen, kids who die—
Maybe, now, there will be no monument for you
Except in our hearts
Maybe your bodies’ll be lost in a swamp
Or a prison grave, or the potter’s field,
Or the rivers where you’re drowned like Leibknecht
But the day will come—
You are sure yourselves that it is coming—
When the marching feet of the masses
Will raise for you a living monument of love,
And joy, and laughter,
And black hands and white hands clasped as one,
And a song that reaches the sky—
The song of the life triumphant
Through the kids who die.




Let America be America Again

Let America be America again.
Let it be the dream it used to be.
Let it be the pioneer on the plain
Seeking a home where he himself is free.

(America never was America to me.)

Let America be the dream the dreamers dreamed--
Let it be that great strong land of love
Where never kings connive nor tyrants scheme
That any man be crushed by one above.

(It never was America to me.)

O, let my land be a land where Liberty
Is crowned with no false patriotic wreath,
But opportunity is real, and life is free,
Equality is in the air we breathe.

(There's never been equality for me,
Nor freedom in this "homeland of the free.")

Say, who are you that mumbles in the dark?
And who are you that draws your veil across the stars?

I am the poor white, fooled and pushed apart,
I am the Negro bearing slavery's scars.
I am the red man driven from the land,
I am the immigrant clutching the hope I seek--
And finding only the same old stupid plan
Of dog eat dog, of mighty crush the weak.

I am the young man, full of strength and hope,
Tangled in that ancient endless chain
Of profit, power, gain, of grab the land!
Of grab the gold! Of grab the ways of satisfying need!
Of work the men! Of take the pay!
Of owning everything for one's own greed!

I am the farmer, bondsman to the soil.
I am the worker sold to the machine.
I am the Negro, servant to you all.
I am the people, humble, hungry, mean--
Hungry yet today despite the dream.
Beaten yet today--O, Pioneers!
I am the man who never got ahead,
The poorest worker bartered through the years.

Yet I'm the one who dreamt our basic dream
In the Old World while still a serf of kings,
Who dreamt a dream so strong, so brave, so true,
That even yet its mighty daring sings
In every brick and stone, in every furrow turned
That's made America the land it has become.
O, I'm the man who sailed those early seas
In search of what I meant to be my home--
For I'm the one who left dark Ireland's shore,
And Poland's plain, and England's grassy lea,
And torn from Black Africa's strand I came
To build a "homeland of the free."

The free?
Who said the free?  Not me?
Surely not me?  The millions on relief today?
The millions shot down when we strike?
The millions who have nothing for our pay?
For all the dreams we've dreamed
And all the songs we've sung
And all the hopes we've held
And all the flags we've hung,
The millions who have nothing for our pay--
Except the dream that's almost dead today.

O, let America be America again--
The land that never has been yet--
And yet must be--the land where every man is free.
The land that's mine--the poor man's, Indian's, Negro's, ME--
Who made America,
Whose sweat and blood, whose faith and pain,
Whose hand at the foundry, whose plow in the rain,
Must bring back our mighty dream again.

Sure, call me any ugly name you choose--
The steel of freedom does not stain.
From those who live like leeches on the people's lives,
We must take back our land again,
America!

O, yes,
I say it plain,
America never was America to me,
And yet I swear this oath--

America will be!

Out of the rack and ruin of our gangster death,
The rape and rot of graft, and stealth, and lies,
We, the people, must redeem
The land, the mines, the plants, the rivers.
The mountains and the endless plain--
All, all the stretch of these great green states--

And make America again!


Langston Hughes published several books of poetry: The Weary Blues, Knopf, 1926; Fine Clothes to the Jew, Knopf,1927; The Negro Mother and Other Dramatic Recitations, Golden Stair Press, 1931; Dear Lovely Death, Troutbeck Press, 1931; The Dream Keeper and Other Poems, Knopf, 1932; Scottsboro Limited: Four Poems and a Play, Golden Stair Press, 1932; A New Song, International Workers Order, 1938; (With Robert Glenn) Shakespeare in Harlem, Knopf, 1942; Jim Crow's Last Stand, Negro Publication Society of America, 1943; Freedom's Plow, Musette Publishers, 1943; Lament for Dark Peoples and Other Poems, Holland, 1944; Fields of Wonder, Knopf, 1947; One-Way Ticket, Knopf, 1949; Montage of a Dream Deferred, Holt, 1951; Ask Your Mama: Twelve Moods for Jazz, Knopf, 1961; The Panther and the Lash: Poems of Our Times, 1967, posthumously: Knopf, Vintage Books, 1992; The Collected Poems of Langston Hughes, Knopf, 1994; The Block: Poems, Viking, 1995; Carol of the Brown King: Poems, Atheneum Books, 1997; The Pasteboard Bandit, Oxford University Press (New York, NY), 1997.


Hughes poems were published in such periodicals as Poetry, The New Yorker, The New York Times, Washington Post, Black Scholar, New Republic, New York Times Book Review, Ebony, English Journal, Nation and many others. Hughes also wrote volumes of short stories, non-fiction, and juvenile literature. He wrote numerous plays and screenplays, translations, two novels, and two autobiographies (Poetry Foundation).  


Langston Hughes (1902 – 1967)


1 comment:

  1. Thanks so much for putting this out. Get ready for a huge march in Washington with over 100 groups participating in May. The enemy is the same no matter what the problems--religious and political ideologues and billionaires who want to control the rest of us.

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